FREE ACT® PRACTICE QUESTIONS

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ACT Practice Questions

For Question 1, the italics with numbers will correspond with sets of alternative words/phrases. From the options, choose the answer choice that works best in context. You will usually be offered the option “NO CHANGE,” which you should choose if you think the passage is fine as is.

Most people who live in cold-winter climates consider shoveling snow a chore. But at my home high in the mountains of Colorado, I’ve started to approach it as an art. The frequent snowstorms that roll through the area (1) gives me many chances to refine my shoveling technique.

  • A. NO CHANGE
  • B. give
  • C. are given
  • D. is giving

For Question 2, the italics with numbers will correspond with sets of alternative words/phrases. From the options, choose the answer choice that works best in context. You will usually be offered the option “NO CHANGE,” which you should choose if you think the passage is fine as is.

Several people in my area have their (2) driveway’s cleared by a pickup truck with a plow mounted where it is anchored on its front. It’s less work, but the piles in front of their houses seem awkward and sloppy. I prefer my polished snowbanks, their temporary beauty heightened for me by my understanding that, come spring, they will be reduced to little more than mud.

  • A. NO CHANGE
  • B. driveways'
  • C. driveways
  • D. driveways's

For Question 3, the italics with numbers will correspond with sets of alternative words/phrases. From the options, choose the answer choice that works best in context. You will usually be offered the option “NO CHANGE,” which you should choose if you think the passage is fine as is.

Several people in my area have their driveway’s cleared by a pickup truck with a plow mounted (3) where it is anchored on its front. It’s less work, but the piles in front of their houses seem awkward and sloppy. I prefer my polished snowbanks, their temporary beauty heightened for me by my understanding that, come spring, they will be reduced to little more than mud.

  • A. NO CHANGE
  • B. and attached
  • C. with it fastened
  • D. DELETE the italicized portion

Television screen sizes are the diagonal length of the rectangular screen. Hector recently changed from watching a television with a 13-inch screen to a television with a similar 19-inch screen. If a boxcar appeared 8 inches long on the 13-inch screen, how long, to the nearest inch, will it appear on the 19-inch screen?

  • A. 10
  • B. 12
  • C. 14
  • D. 16
  • E. 18

A flight instructor charges $50 per lesson, plus an additional fee for the use of his plane. The charge for the use of the plane varies directly with the square root of the time the plane is used. If a lesson plus 16 minutes of plane usage costs $90, what is the total amount charged for a lesson having 36 minutes of plane usage?

  • A. $185
  • B. $150
  • C. $135
  • D. $110
  • E. $60

In the figure below, ∠BAC measures 30°, ∠ABC measures 110°, and points B, C, and D are collinear. What is the measure of ∠ACD ?

NATURAL SCIENCE: This passage is adapted from Change in the House of Fate: A Natural History of Heredity by Jennifer Ackerman (©2001 by Jennifer Ackerman).

Nearly every kind of animal has some kind of eye, from the eyespot of a microscopic tardigrade—a simple affair of five or so light-sensitive receptor cells, which can tell the creature about the distribution of light and darkness but cannot form images—to the sophisticated “camera-style” eyes of humans and octopuses, which can see images of brilliant clarity.

Ancient Greeks believed that the eye had the probing power of touch. The philosopher Plato held that particles streamed from the eyes like probing rays, touching an object and thus making it visible. But his student Aristotle attacked the idea: “It is unreasonable to suppose that seeing occurs by something issuing from the eye.” Objects emanated rays, which impinged on the eyes with the help of air. As Cicero described it, “The air itself sees together with us.” Even the physician Galen, who knew the anatomy and physiology of the eye, knew the cornea, iris, vitreous and aqueous humors, and retina, and identified the crystalline lens as the chief organ of sight—even he thought intervening air an instrument of vision. Not until the seventeenth century was it fully accepted that what we see is not the bird itself but the light reflected by it.

The author mentions a bird at the end of the second paragraph mainly to:

  • A. help illustrate the accepted notion of how sight works.
  • B. contrast the clarity of a bird’s vision with that of a human’s vision.
  • C. explain how Galen used birds in his vision-related experiments.
  • D. provide an example of how eyes have evolved.

Today, biologists who have traced the evolution of different visual systems in the animal kingdom believe that eyes evolved at least forty times in different lineages. Imagine this great revolution in vision, eyes opening everywhere: the bulging multifaceted eyes of the dragonfly; the colossal pie-like eyes of ichthyosaurs, twenty-two centimeters across, the better to see in the dark of the deep sea; the bulbous eyes of alligators popping up through duckweed scum; the quick black eyes of a lizard; the long, tubular, highly sensitive telescopic eyes of the deep-sea fish Scopelarchius, which point straight up through black water to gather the dim silhouette of prey against residual sunlight.

The oldest known eye, that of a fossil trilobite, is a compound eye as big as a dragonfly’s. At least half of all animals, including most insects, have compound eyes. Unlike the human eye, with its single lens and single retina, a compound eye is an intricate arrangement of many little eyes, or ommatidia, each with its own retina and lens. A firefly’s eye has several hundred ommatidia; a honeybee’s eye, several thousand.

The examples in the passage mainly serve to illustrate the:

  • A. types of visual systems that are considered superior to that of humans.
  • B. wide variety of eye types that have evolved in the animal kingdom.
  • C. frequency with which the compound eye is found in the animal kingdom.
  • D. impact that eye size has on an organism’s ability to see underwater.

Today, biologists who have traced the evolution of different visual systems in the animal kingdom believe that eyes evolved at least forty times in different lineages. Imagine this great revolution in vision, eyes opening everywhere: the bulging multifaceted eyes of the dragonfly; the colossal pie-like eyes of ichthyosaurs, twenty-two centimeters across, the better to see in the dark of the deep sea; the bulbous eyes of alligators popping up through duckweed scum; the quick black eyes of a lizard; the long, tubular, highly sensitive telescopic eyes of the deep-sea fish Scopelarchius, which point straight up through black water to gather the dim silhouette of prey against residual sunlight.

According to the passage, the structure of the Scopelarchius’s eyes allows it to detect prey that is:

  • A. in the water above it.
  • B. on the seafloor.
  • C. too tiny to be seen by the human eye.
  • D. too quick to be seen by other predators.

Flameless ration heaters (FRHs) are used by combat soldiers to heat their meals in the field. The heat is produced when magnesium reacts with water (see formula below).

The rate of the reaction increases in the presence of iron (Fe) and sodium chloride (NaCl). The following experiment was done to determine how to design FRHs.

Experiment:

Powdered Mg (0.10 mol) was mixed with 0.50 mol of Fe powder and added to 100 mL of H2O at 20°C in an insulated container. The mixture was stirred constantly and the maximum temperature increase that occurred within 15 min was recorded. The procedure was repeated with different amounts of NaCl (see Table below).

Which of the following is the most likely reason that amounts greater than 0.125 mol of NaCl were not tested in the Experiment? The results showed that:

Flameless ration heaters (FRHs) are used by combat soldiers to heat their meals in the field. The heat is produced when magnesium reacts with water (see formula below).

The rate of the reaction increases in the presence of iron (Fe) and sodium chloride (NaCl). The following experiment was done to determine how to design FRHs.

Experiment:

Powdered Mg (0.10 mol) was mixed with 0.50 mol of Fe powder and added to 100 mL of H2O at 20°C in an insulated container. The mixture was stirred constantly and the maximum temperature increase that occurred within 15 min was recorded. The procedure was repeated with different amounts of NaCl (see Table below).

Based on the results of the Experiment, one can reasonably conclude that as the amount of NaCl added increased from 0 mol to 0.100 mol, the maximum rise in temperature within 15 min of the start of the reaction:

Flameless ration heaters (FRHs) are used by combat soldiers to heat their meals in the field. The heat is produced when magnesium reacts with water (see formula below).

The rate of the reaction increases in the presence of iron (Fe) and sodium chloride (NaCl). The following experiment was done to determine how to design FRHs.

Experiment:

Powdered Mg (0.10 mol) was mixed with 0.50 mol of Fe powder and added to 100 mL of H2O at 20°C in an insulated container. The mixture was stirred constantly and the maximum temperature increase that occurred within 15 min was recorded. The procedure was repeated with different amounts of NaCl (see Table below).

If a trial had been done in the Experiment with 0.060 mol of NaCl added, the maximum temperature increase of the mixture that would have occurred within 15 min would have been closest to:

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